Tag Archives: Roxie Munro

Kids’ Choices for Best Books!

Irma Black award, designed by Maurice Sendak

The Irma Black award, designed by Maurice Sendak

The kids have spoken!

The Irma Black Award, given by The Bank Street School,  is unusual in that children are the final judges of the winning book.  This year’s award went to Big Mean Mike, written by Michelle Knudsen and illustrated by Scott Magoon.  More than 7,500 first and second graders around the world voted  Big Mean Mike as their clear favorite.

There were three other Irma Black honor books, also chosen by kids themselves:

The Cook Prize medal, designed by Brian Floca

Children also choose The Cook Prize winners, sponsored by The Bank Street School:  The best science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) picture books published for children aged eight to ten. This year’s winner is:

The honor winners are:

Congratulations to all the winners!

The Next Big Thing

. . . comes in threes !

[1]  Blog hop* time!

It’s been awhile since my last post.  I’ve been deeply immersed in the world of online learning & teaching, at UCSD Extension. What an adrenaline rush!

illustration by Debbie TilleyI will share highlights (my students were awesome) next week. Alumni & friends will be invited to comment. In the meantime…

[2] I was tagged …

Slithery Snakes by Roxie Munroby the amazeing Roxie Munro , who shares links on creating apps for books at my public Got Story? Facebook page.  Her books are a maze of dazzling fact-filled wonders. Besides creating e-books, she takes you inside and outside of cities, events, and creatures (eggs, bugs, and snakes, oh my), and much more. Do check out Roxie’s blog-hop responses here.

* What is a blog-hop? An author is tagged to answer a set of questions at their own blog. They then tag two other authors with blogs, to keep the blog-hop going.

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I think I’m the first blogger/art director/book designer/teacher who’s ever blog-hopped this event! Here goes:
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1. What is the title of your work-in-progress? The Gallaudet American Sign Language Dictionary for Children  [as art director/designer, and production artist, that is].

2. Where did the idea come from?  *Gallaudet University Press editor Ivey Wallace.

[* Note: Based in Washington DC, Gallaudet University is the only institution of higher learning whose programs and services are customized to accommodate deaf and hearing-impaired students. Thomas Gallaudet (1787–1851) was a pioneering figure in the advancement of deaf education.]
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Illustration for ASL word entry, T.V.
[ASL sign for TV, by Debbie Tilley (l) and Peggy Lott (r)]
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Debbie Tilley was selected because her witty illustrations communicate well to children and adults. Debbie’s agent Richard Salzman recommended my services as a free-lance designer who’s fluent working with artists and editors; and in the prep of layouts and electronic files for print and other media.

ASL entry for twins

ASL entry for twins

3. What genre does your book come under? Children’s illustrated /Ages 3-11 / reference / American Sign Language / parenting / instructional / school / general trade

4. Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie?  A wide spectrum of fluent multicultural ASL signing children, ages 4 through 11, will be in the accompanying DVD. A joyous group!

5. One sentence synopsis for your book? A kid-friendly definitive children’s American Sign Language dictionary with companion DVD, of over 1,000 entries, humorously illustrated by Debbie (Hey Little Ant!) Tilley alongside easy-to-follow signing diagrams by an unparalleled team of ASL experts.

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6. Is your book self-published, published by an independent publisher, or represented by an agency?
Due out Fall 2014, from Gallaudet University Press.

7. How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript? Debbie, the signing illustration team, and I were supplied with the final word list in December 2010. We’ve all bAaeen collaborating steadily since then. That’s over 1,000 illustrations from Debbie; and 1,000+ diagrams from the signing team. Sketches, approval process, revisions, final art, organizing, scanning, etc. Sentences are composed as layouts are formed.

8. What other books would you compare this story to within your genre? There’s none like it. Anywhere.

9. Who or what inspired you to write this book? The Gallaudet University Board of Directors made this project part of their mandate. The jewel of the crown.

10.What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest? In addition to instructors, students, and users, parents will want to teach ASL to their babies, who are often able to sign before they can talk! Imagine that. Real-life ASL, and it’s from Gallaudet, the go-to source!

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And now, I’m blog-tagging three friends. Visit their blogs for…

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[3] Tag 1, 2, 3…

My colleague Andrea Zimmerman [1] teaches the writing aspect of picture book creation at UCSD Extension  [Writing Children’s Picture Books (WCWP-40261)] with Sara Tomp. Check out her fabulous blog, Picture Book Party here. She is both an author and author/illustrator. Among her many titles are Train Man (with David Clemesha); Eliza’s Cherry Trees; and Trashy Town (illustrated by Dan Yaccarino).

Julian Hector [2] draws and writes stories in his inimitable way. Visit his blog here. Check out C.R. Curmudgeon (written by Leslie Muir); Monday is One Day (written by Arthur Levine); The Little Matador; and The Gentleman Bug. Here’s the trailer for his 10 Scary Animals: A Field Guide.

Kathleen Krull [3] roots out the most interesting aspects of a person’s life, and distills it into snappy delightful prose. Let’s peek at her über-awesome output:

KKrull_Facebook_cover

I knew her back in the days of Harcourt, San Diego (she was Senior Editor, I was Art Director), where she edited luminaries like Tomie dePaola, Eve Bunting, Patricia Hermes, Anne Lindbergh, Jane Yolen, and Amy Schwartz, before she left to launch her own writing career.

She also collaborates with husband Paul Brewer on projects — including The Beatles Were Fab (and They Were Funny), and Lincoln Tells a Joke: How Laughter Saved the President (and the Country). In 2011, she won the Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award for her body of work.

NOTE: Since Kathy uses her Facebook page in lieu of a blog as of this writing, her Q & As (and tagging) will happen here at the Got Story Countdown. Watch for announcements, and spread the word. . . 

Show us your latest picture book!

We’ll be seeing some sparkling new picture books with spring just around the corner.

Here are just a few, sent in by book friends. We’re get up close and personal on the collaborative aspect, in weeks to come. Stay tuned!

Roxie Munro has a new book, Hatch!, just published by Marshall Cavendish. It’s a big picture book with a guessing game about eggs, and the birds that hatch from them.

In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb, by Bauer/McCully

Marion Dane Bauer has a new book coming soon, with illustrations by Caldecott medalist Emily Arnold McCully.

Illustrator Lori McElrath-Eslick‘s new book is by NYC fireman Tim Hoppey.

Popular librarian Jeanette Larson has a new book, Hummingbirds: Facts and Folklore from the Americas, beautifully illustrated with textile art byAdrienne Yorinks, just published by Charlesbridge. There will be a Book Release party at Book People (Austin) on March 5 at noon. The book looks at the facts about hummingbirds and couples that information with folktales from peoples of the Americas. Great for kids or birders of any age.

The dynamic mother-daughter duo of Anne Rockwell and Lizzy Rockwell returns with First Day of School, featuring the children we’ve met in their previous classroom holiday books. We will get a sneak peek here!

And Bridget Strevens-Marzo writes us from France:

I’ve really appreciate your Got Story interviews on digital books; and Anne Rockwell; but I’m running to catch up! That’s why I identify with the snail in the book I illustrated, MINI RACER, just out yesterday with Bloomsbury US and UK. Kristy Dempsey’s text is a zooming romp of an action poem so I had to come up with all the characters from a mouse in a cheese car to alligators in a gas-guzzling Cadillac and a visual storyline that fit their personalities. So far, no one has noticed that the most eco-friendly vehicles get furthest in the race. . .

Mini Racer by Dempsey and Strevens-Marzo

[An update: This cover is from the U.K. edition. Go here to see the U.S. version. — JC]

Do you have a new book coming out this spring?  Drop me a line. You could be in for a lot of nosy questions about it at the Countdown!